The Pros and Cons of Fu*k You Money

The term Fu*k You Money is an idea that came to prominence back in the 1980s via books like The Show Business Nobody Knows and films like Heat with Burt Reynolds. For those of you unfamiliar with it’s meaning, the idea Fu*k You Money is simple: Accumulate enough money to where you can live off of its vast supply without ever having to worry about wage paying work ever again, or in a more realistic scenario, enough money socked away to where you could quit your current job today and not be worried about paying your bills for an extended period as you look for the next. Now, instead of speaking to the reality of achieving such a goal (however, it’s more doable than you may think), I want to look at the pros and cons it can have on your performance if you achieve it.
Early retirement bloggers like the Mad Fientist write extensively on the topic of how to achiever financial independence, as well as how to fill the void of work afterward if you do hang ‘em up in your thirties or forties. Occasionally they even touch on the topic of this article but usually not in much detail.
Think about all the things in your job that you don’t enjoy, all the parts that are a total waste of time. Think about the last time your boss asked for feedback on an idea, and all the talking heads and yes men bobbed their chins up and down with empty smiles on their faces, eager to curry favor? On the flip side think of that last time you had to meet a deadline and your motivation and drive spiked along with what I like to call the simple ability to “get shit done”. Think of the promotion you have been striving towards and the focus and work you have put towards achieving it. Fu*k You Money can have a drastic effect on all of these situations.

Pros of Fu*k You Money

In a Harvard Business Review article titled “The Elements of Great Communication, According to Aristotle”, Scott Edinger writes that Aristotle was essentially correct when he identified the three key elements of communication thousands of years ago in ethos (credibility), pathos (emotional connection), and logos (logic). While those are very stripped down definitions, they will work for what we are talking about. In modern day work places, specifically large corporations, high performing employees with the courage to speak out in an open and honest way about what is working and what is not working, what is useful tradition and what is meaningless bureaucracy, are few and far between. The key part of that previous sentence was “high performing”. Most employees offering criticism of the status quo are poor performers who are viewed as making excuses (low in ethos) or malcontents who are always complaining about something or other, so we routinely ignore their comments (low in pathos).
However, anyone who has been able to earn and save Fu*k You Money, likely is a capable employee simply by means of their ability to be organized, financially responsible, and goal oriented. These employees, finally relieved of the “I need a paycheck this Friday to pay rent” phenomenon are now able to communicate and work with supervisors, direct reports, or fellow employees in a way that fosters open communication. As a solid performer or even high achiever, you have likely already accumulated a piggy bank full of ethos and pathos. When you sprinkle a little bit of logos on top, your message is likely to be heard. Without the fear of “ruining your reputation” or “ stirring the pot”, you will be amazed at the results your open and honest feedback can produce. Is this something you could begin practicing now, without Fu*k You Money piled under your mattress? Of course you can. And the office would be a better place if you did.

Cons of Fu*k You Money

However, Fu*k You Money can carry with it some negatives as well, as crazy as that may sound. But don’t worry I can hear you talking to your computer screen right now, “Hey whatever those issues are, I’ll take ‘em.” First of all….well, duh, agreed. But that doesn’t mean they aren’t worth thinking about.
According to numerous studies, as incentives and compensation increase, motivation actually decreases. Yep, you read that right. The idea of making more money may get someone to work hard or longer. But once the person has the money, the opposite can happen. Most importantly, the decrease is actually found in the person’s intrinsic motivation, a much more powerful force, and one tied more closely to fulfillment and happiness. Extrinsic motivations in fact tend to relate to lower engagement among employees. So if you have saved up your Fu*k You Money, you now have the freedom and capital to speak openly and honestly, but will you have the motivation to do so? Changing an organization is tough work, an uphill battle if you will. Now that you can rock the boat, will you be able to scrounge up the gumption to do so?
We can also take this idea further, even outside the workplace. While being over stressed has been linked to numerous health issues, many of them eventually fatal, it is also clear that stress in the right instances and situations (usually short term), drives performance. Our bodies and minds can use stress to reach for higher efficiencies in order to meet deadlines. The trick here is as Fu*k You Money begins to accumulate, employees need to take steps to move their work in a direction that they are more passionate about. Focus on your intrinsic motivations and build routines that keep you focused. As the saying goes, motivation is what gets your started, but habit is what keeps you going.

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Productivity Points 1.0

 

There is so much to be written about productivity and how to maximize it, that there is little use in trying to capture it all in one work, no matter the distance between the covers. Few readers would have the patience to read it, and no writers would have the lifespan to write it. Instead it is best to take productivity pointers in bite sized chunks. If you come across one hundred different ways to improve you productivity, and want to try them out, chances are you try a handful. If instead you were to encounter two of them every week for a year, I’d wager your success with implementation would rise significantly. In that spirit, I will mostly keep these productivity points short.
In a recent blog post, Sam Altman, of Y Combinator fame, wrote a laundry list of productivity practices he has come to implement over time. They range from his sleeping and eating habits to the ideal length of a meeting (which is often zero minutes). A couple of his points stand out as particularly striking and worth an attempt at trying out.

Examine What You Are Working On:

One of the most basic and absolutely most influential aspects of productivity is the importance of what you are working on and your interest level. If you love something enough, you do it in your free time. You find a way to squeeze it into your day. Imagine having just half of that interest in your work projects?

But I get it. In the corporate world, you don’t always get to choose. Don’t pretend you don’t have influence here, though. Most employees do. What boss does not like a direct report coming to them with a project they’d like to contribute to? If you don’t like what you are working on, and you truly can’t influence it where you work, then maybe it is where you work that you need to change.

Prioritize, Prioritize, Prioritize

There are a number of ways to practice this. Start the day with your most challenging project. You should be at your most energized and will not want to tackle this item later when you are drained. You will also feel accomplished when it’s done, which can spur further productivity. Bonus tip: Don’t schedule meetings at this time. Your productivity is wasted in meetings.

Another way of saying this is to “Eat the frog”, which comes from quote people love to attribute to Mark Twain (I’m unsure if it’s accurate and you can’t believe the internet when it comes to Mark Twain quotes). He is reported to have said that if you start the day eating a live frog, you at least know the worst of your day is behind you. Tackle your worst project first. Everything else will feel smooth from there on out and it will relieve the stress you are placing on yourself by leaving that item hanging over your head all day long.

The third skill to learn here is to become good at saying, “No.” Learn what is important to get done and what is not. You don’t have to fix every problem or put out every fire. You will get yourself into trouble if you try. Saying no to something is simply allowing yourself to say yes to something more important when it arises, if it’s not already staring you in the face.

Use a Full Spectrum LED

For the most actionable item on the list, try this. Full spectrum LED lights have a host of benefits, including helping with SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) for those of us in the colder, darker climates. Altman says he uses his for 10-15 minutes every morning while he works through emails, and it is the one of the best things he has implemented. Not what I expected to find in this article, but mine will be getting delivered by Amazon by the end of the week…