Why You Should Burn Your SMART Goals

You know those SMART goals that your boss made you set this year for your personal development? The ones that are supposed to make you better at something or other? Or maybe you made them for yourself on a personal journey you wanted to undertake. Either way, go ahead and pull those out, and set them on fire. Yeah go ahead and burn the shit out of them. Or right click on the file and with a flourish smash down the delete button. Now let’s talk about why.

Just about everyone in the business world is familiar with SMART goals by now. Some of the words in the acronym have been switched around or interchanged over time, but the gist is below:
S. – Specific

M. – Measurable

A. – Achievable

R. – Realistic

T. – Time based

When you think about those goals that I just had you shred, and look at them in this format, how inspired were you? How visionary did you feel? Did they excite you and get you out of bed in the morning? My hunch is they didn’t.
It’s a subtle difference, but what you should do instead is set SMART milestones. Your goals, though? Make them audacious. Make them exciting. Make them a vision so grand that when you think about them, you get so damn excited that you can’t help but go and work towards them. Your steps along the way? Yeah, make those bite-sized. But they aren’t your goals. They are just the stairs you have to climb up to your unrealistic, un-measurable, impossible, unrealistic, timeless aspirations. Go ahead, get to burning.

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How Shooting Free Throws Can Help Your Business

As many will know, Wilt Chamberlain is considered one of the greatest basketball players to ever live. He even once accomplished the unthinkable, scoring one hundred points in a single game! However, like many seven-foot-tall basketball players, he was a horrendous free throw shooter, averaging one season at about 38%. His career average was also abysmal at 51%. How in the world can one of the best basketball players to ever live only hit 51% of his shots from just fifteen feet away while no one was attempting to block him? Clearly there are some mind games at play, but not all of them follow the rules you would expect.

What will likely didn’t know is that Wilt Chamberlain actually knew how to improve his free throw shooting. He had even proven it worked, too. He just chose not to do it. Surprised?

In order improve his free throw percentage, Wilt Chamberlain took the advice of Rick Barry (another NBA all-time great) and shot the ball underhand, the same way you may have seen done in the movie Hoosiers. This drastically improved his percentage and eliminated a major weakness in his game for almost an entire season, which turned out to be his career best at 61% (This season also included that 100 point game, a game during which Chamberlain hit 28 of 32 free throws. However, the very next season, he decided to go back to shooting overhand, resuming his awful performance. What world class performer would do this?

Later, Wilt agreed he should have kept shooting underhand but just didn’t. He knew what was best for him. He knew what was the right choice. He simply didn’t make it. Shaquille O’Neal, another famously bad free throw shooter, said he would rather shoot 0% on his free throws than ever shoot underhand. These players were more worried about peer pressure and perception than they were about their results.

How often do we make the same decisions in the workplace and in our business? We know that making an extra sales call will yield better numbers. We know that engaging our employees hearts and minds will improve turnover and retention. We are fully aware that attention to detail and transparency with both customers and employees will create healthier business.

But sometimes, even though we are fully aware it does not make sense, we simply don’t do these things. There are myriad reasons why, but the most common is that we don’t want to make a decision that we perceive in our heads to be unpopular or difficult. We take the easier road. I challenge you to make the decisions that will get you greater results, not what will make your life easier.

When you look back at the careers of Rick Barry and Wilt Chamberlain it is unquestionable who was the better basketball player. However, what is most striking, and somewhat sad in retrospect, is that you could convincingly argue that Rick Barry was the best basketball player he was capable of being, underhand free throws and all, while Wilt Chamberlain, as good as he was, never lived up to his full potential. Unrealized potential is one of life’s great tragedies. Can you say the same about your business career?

 

***To end this post, I want to begin with a simple recommendation. If you don’t listen to the podcast This American Life, you should. I am saying nothing groundbreaking as it is one of the top downloaded podcasts in the country, but for those of you that have not yet discovered the wonderful world that is podcasts, go check it out, as that is the source of the material for this post. This American Life featured the story from Malcolm Gladwell’s podcast Revisionist History, another gem.

 

Culture Above All

Why do so many damn talented people fail? I see intelligent people with incredible ideas constantly failing at leading groups in the direction that their vision is telling them to go. These people are not stupid. I don’t think so at least. They simply cannot get their strategies off the ground. They make videos of early airplane designers look positively hopeful.

When most people take a look at a business and want to improve results, they often take a look at processes, procedures, and strategies. They create a game plan to change or improve and then go about enacting what they have planned. Sometimes these plans work and sometimes they don’t. There is however, something that can be focused on daily that will always driver better results. It will work each and every time. That magic pill is culture. The best quote that illustrates this has been attributed to Peter Drucker, a business and management consultant:

Culture eats strategy for breakfast.

No matter the strategy you create or the plan you come up with, it will not work if your group or organization does not have a strong culture – or even worse has a poor one. If you walk into your office everyday and not only do people not want to be there, but they actively voice it, then you have a culture issue. If your coworkers complain about hard work, then you have a culture issue. Cultivate a strong culture and you will cultivate a strong business. Here’s a hint as well: You don’t have to be a manager to do this.

People in a group need to understand the direction of the organization and work to get it moving that way. Otherwise whatever strategy you have created is destined to fail. If you create a strong culture, truly believe in it, and act it out every single day, it will become contagious and spread like chicken pox through a Kindergarten classroom. If you neglect culture, then I don’t care how smart you are. Your ceiling is barely above your head.

So next time you want to improve one of your numbers, instead of thinking of a new process or strategy, take a look instead at your positivity, at your competitive urgency or your professionalism and work to improve those instead, both personally and within your organization. You will be amazed with your results.

Want to Succeed? Stop Relying on Motivation.

There is a saying “Motivation is what gets you started. Habit is what keeps you keeps you going.” This quote is attributed to Jim Rohn, an author and motivational speaker. I will be honest in that I have not read much of Jim Rohn’s work, nor have I heard him speak, but this does not stop me from being a fervent believer in that simple declaration.
It’s easy to do. You see someone who is in better shape than you. Or is younger than you but more accomplished. Or is admired by someone who you wish spent more time admiring you… Whatever is causing it, we all know that feeling of deep-seated motivation that would cause us to run through a wall. We make all kinds of grandiose declarations to friends and families about the changes we are going to make and the work we are going to put in. We daydream about the results we are going to see from our extra work, our self-control, and our dedication. We may even go out and spend money on items we think will help us to get there!
Unfortunately for the majority of us, the alarm clock that goes off an hour early the next morning in order to help us fulfill all of those promises does not deliver with it a does of that same energy. Often the feeling is gone, just like that. In the span of 12 – 24 hours that unstoppable drive, that incredible force, has been muted and muffled by a few short hours of sleep. Some of us manage to keep the flame alive for a while, long enough to eventually retire from our new endeavors with little to no shame. But the majority of the population never even gets that far.
It is my firm belief, that what stops us from getting where we want to be – where those intense internal passions told us we deserved to be – is a simple lack of discipline and organization, a vast majority of which can be solved through habit and routine. Did you know that Maya Angelou wrote regularly in hotel rooms to minimize her distractions? Did you know that Benjamin Franklin broke his day down into hour by hour intervals, one of which included “examination of the day”? Were you aware that Ernest Hemingway liked to stop writing in the middle of an idea so he had a fresh place to get started the next day without having to stare at the page for inspiration?
When you hit the wall – and you will hit the wall, quite violently, I promise – you need to fall back on routines and habits. That way your motivation has nothing to do with it. Your body  and mind simply behave as they believe they are supposed to. The best book I have ever read on the subject is below. Give it a look. Later you will agree that it was more than worth your time when you look back at a goal you have accomplished instead of up to where it is still hanging over you.

 

 

 

Disclosure: this page contains affiliate links. This means if you click on a link and make a purchase, we will receive an affiliate commission. But in all honesty, the book is damn good. I wouldn’t post about it if it wasn’t. Enjoy.