You Get What You Celebrate

While it may be a cliché in the workplace, it is also indisputable that “What gets measured, gets managed.” In other words, as soon as something becomes a KPI, gets placed on a performance review, is tied to compensation, or becomes the CEO’s new hot button, it is almost certain that performance around this new metric will rise.
Well that’s simple then. In your business, if you want to improve something, simply begin measuring it and stack ranking the results. You are almost guaranteed to see your work or your team’s work improve in this area. Without getting too deep into the pros and cons of the KPI culture in corporate America, there are some drawbacks to this approach however, and there are times when it can backfire. Instead of delving into those examples (maybe another time…), let’s instead consider an alternative.
In a recent interview, Frank Blake, the former CEO of Home Depot made a comment that you could say is a close cousin to “What gets measured, gets managed,” but takes a different approach and arguably stands to make a more positive cultural influence on your organization: “You get what you celebrate.”
This sounds incredibly simple, and essentially it is. However, how often do you see bosses, parents, etc. who desire a certain behavior attempt to get there via either negative reinforcement or management via measurement as referenced above? Blake, however, speaks to how he encouraged a culture customer service at Home Depot beyond what a survey could measure. He drove this behavior via hundreds of handwritten notes to employees who demonstrated these qualities. He inspired this focus with break room TVs that celebrated above and beyond customer service stories. This is the transformational approach – the cultural approach – to achieving a behavior you desire. This is effective at work, at home, in parenting, and in relationships. So the next time you want to influence a positive change, think about it differently. Can you make the change come about via celebration?

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