Make Smaller Maps

The bigger the map, the bigger the potential mistakes. Work with closer goals and course correct along the way.

Show of hands, who has been to the Mountains of Kong? Oh really? I doubt it. The Mountains of Kong are a non-existent mountain range that magically spanned the continent of Africa for much of the 1800s. James Rennell, Johann Reinecke, and John Cary all displayed this massive range on their maps and engravings, while famous explorers such as René Caillié, Lemon Lander, and Hugh Clapperton all included this on their maps as well. There are various lessons you could derive from this story, but the one I want to focus on relates to a phrase from Scott Berkun’s book A Year Without Pants. Not only does the book have one of the best names ever penned, but useful nuggets are buried throughout its pages regarding modern work and the accompanying challenges around remote workspaces, project management, and culture.
One of the more striking bits of wisdom in A Year Without Pants is Berkun’s supplication to his readers to “Make smaller maps.” Berkun’s point is that when creating a road map for a project or goal, if you set out every piece in advance for a large project, all the way to completion, and then attempt then to follow it, you run the larger risk of being drastically wrong. However, if you work with smaller maps, simply moving yourself in the direction of where you need to go, or even think you need to go, you are much more likely to discover mistakes and course correct along the way. You are not blinded by the destination way off in the distance, leading you further afield. You instead focus on the goal just in front of you, which in turn moves you in the right direction. The faulty pieces of your map come more easily to light and you can fix them, creating a stronger product or process.
So work with smaller maps, make sure your progress is accurate and building soundly upon your previous steps. While you certainly need to be aware of what is on the horizon, if you have created a map with a destination deep in the Mountains of Kong, and are so gung-ho about getting there that you fail to realize your blunder until it is too late, you are going to have a long, embarrassing road home.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s